Gender Pay Gap Data

Gender Pay Gap; as at 31 March 2022

                                          

 Year

2022

2021

2020

2019

2018

2017

Mean gender pay gap;

3.79%

4.67%

2.53%

1.31%

5.13%

2.99%

Median gender pay gap;

-1.51%*

0.00%

0.00%

0.00%

0.00%

1.92%

Proportion of men with bonus**

1.17%

1.79%

1.37%

1.05%

0.00%

0.00%

Proportion of women with bonus**

0.37%

0.68%

0.69%

0.66%

0.97%

0.96%

Mean bonus* gender pay gap

18.8%

1.72%

1.67%

1.72%

n/a

n/a

Median bonus* gender pay gap

1.84%

1.84%

1.65%

1.82%

n/a

n/a

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Percentage of males and females in each of the four pay quartiles:             

 

 

Upper quartile:


Men

Women

 

 

40.62% 

50.38%

 

 

50.69%

49.31%

 

 

49.66%

50.34%

 

 

49.66%

50.34%

 

 

49.34%

50.66%

 

 

47.68%

52.32%

Upper mid-quartile:


Men

Women

 

 

44.62%

55.38%

 

 

46.53%

53.47%

 

 

44.83%

55.17%

 

 

47.30%

52.70%

 

 

48.68%

51.32%

 

 

54.90%

45.10%

Lower mid-quartile:


Men

Women

 

 

50.00%  

50.00%

 

 

47.92%

52.08%

 

 

56.85%

43.15%

 

 

48.30%

51.70%

 

 

45.75%

54.25%

 

 

45.10%

54.90%

Lower quartile: 


Men                                 

Women

 

 

51.13% 

48.76%

 

 

49.31%

50.69%

 

 

49.32%

50.68%

 

 

49.32%

50.68%

 

 

44.74%

55.26%

 

 

48.37%

51.63%

 

* A minus figure indicates that the median pay for women is higher than it is for men

** For the purpose of reporting, market supplement payments are included as “bonus payments”

 

Narrative

In summary, the gender pay gap remains low and is broadly within the parameters that might be expected for similar public sector organisations. The quartile distribution is generally well-balanced with the proportion of women in the upper and upper-medium quartiles being slightly higher than men. This suggests that a higher proportion of women than men hold better-paid jobs in the organisation.

Although the data contained within the analysis is not a matter of concern, the organisation will continue to be aware of the need to aspire to a gender-neutral state in terms of mean pay differential. This year the Council’s Equality and Diversity corporate training programme is being reviewed and will be relaunched to all employees.

The mean gender pay gap is materially lower this year than last. Clearly, there is currently a good balance in terms of gender pay within the top half of the organisation.

Ignoring the “outliers” of higher pay, the median gender pay gap this year is actually showing for the first time that women are earning slightly more than men.

Although the percentage gender pay gap for bonus payments (market supplement payments) does favour men, the sample set is very small (four employees; one woman, three men) with the difference between male and female mean bonus being only £695 over the year. This small sample has skewed the statistics which has produced a high mean GPG for bonus at around 18%. Should market premia be used more due to the financial pressures that may be present over the short to medium term then the equality impact of such “bonus” payments will need to be considered.

The outturn showing a mean Gender Pay Gap of 3.79% and a median gap that favours pay for women suggests that over the whole workforce, the position of pay equality is reasonably healthy.

The organisation considers itself to be caring and recognises the complex needs of its employees through the practical application of supportive working practices.  Practical measures to support such statements include the adoption of flexible working arrangements implemented through its employment policies.  Other policies have also been introduced to support women in the workplace such as the “Menopause in the Workplace Policy”. The Equality Policy (Employment) was also reviewed in early 2021. Currently under consultation are proposals to consider the introduction of a “fostering-friendly” policy.

Although the organisation does not yet have a neutral mean gender pay gap, the gap continues to remain low relative to many other businesses. This positive position reflects the organisation that we aspire to be; a fair place to work and one in which supportive employment policies go hand-in-hand with an established and transparent job evaluation scheme. A risk to the ability to further improve the mean gender pay gap is that the organisation is relatively small and the change in occupation of a few of the Council’s most senior posts could have a material effect on the outturn. A watching brief will be maintained each year and should the outturn worsen to a point of concern then an appropriate action plan will be identified.