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Gender Pay Gap Data

Gender Pay Gap Data

Gender Pay Gap Data

Gender Pay Gap as at 31 March 2021

                                          

 

2021

2020

2019

2018

2017

Mean gender pay gap;

4.67%

2.53%

1.31%

5.13%

2.99%

Median gender pay gap;

0.00%

0.00%

0.00%

0.00%

1.92%

Proportion of men with bonus*

1.79%

1.37%

1.05%

0.00%

0.00%

Proportion of women with bonus*

0.68%

0.69%

0.66%

0.97%

0.96%

Mean bonus* gender pay gap

1.72%

1.67%

1.72%

n/a

n/a

Median bonus* gender pay gap

1.84%

1.65%

1.82%

n/a

n/a

 

 

 

 

 

 

Percentage of males and females in each of the four pay quartiles:

 

Upper quartile:       men

                               women

50.69%

49.31%

49.66%

50.34%

49.66%

50.34%

49.34%

50.66%

47.68%

52.32%

Upper mid-quartile: men

                               women

46.53%

53.47%

44.83%

55.17%

47.30%

52.70%

48.68%

51.32%

54.90%

45.10%

Lower mid-quartile: men

                               women

47.92%

52.08%

56.85%

43.15%

48.30%

51.70%

45.75%

54.25%

45.10%

54.90%

Lower quartile:        men

                                women

49.31%

50.69%

49.32%

50.68%

49.32%

50.68%

44.74%

55.26%

48.37%

51.63%

 

* For the purpose of reporting, market supplement payments are included as “bonus payments”

 

Narrative

In summary, the gender pay gap remains low and is broadly within the parameters that might be expected for similar public sector organisations. The quartile distribution is generally well-balanced. Although the data contained within the analysis is not a matter of concern, the organisation will continue to be aware of the need to aspire to a gender-neutral state in terms of mean pay differential.

 

The mean gender pay gap is again higher this year than last. It has risen for two consecutive years. As the organisation is relatively small a change of only a few post holders (including casuals) working at the “snapshot” date can have a material effect on the data shown as a percentage. Looking at the reality of the last two years the organisation has moved from have a female to a male Chief Executive and senior management reorganisation early in 2021 has seen the loss of some female senior post holders. These changes have had a material effect on the mean gender pay gap.

 

Ignoring the “outliers” of higher pay, the median gender pay gap remains again at 0% indicating that the point at which pay is evenly split within the organisation (the same number of people earn more and less pay) is the same for both men and women.

 

Although the percentage gender pay gap for bonus payments (market supplement payments) slightly favours men, the sample set is very small (seven employees; two women, five men) with the difference between male and female mean bonus being only £51 over the year. The data is current at 31 March 2021 and since that time the number of market supplements paid has reduced and is likely to reduce further following planned structural reviews.

 

The outturn showing a mean gender pay gap of 4.67% and no median gap suggests that over the whole workforce, although the middle pay point in the spread of employee pay is the same between men and women, proportionately men do earn slightly more than women. The quartile data shows that for the first time since data was collected the upper quartile comprises a marginally higher proportion of men than women. The structural reviews mentioned above have had a material impact on this quartile. This year the remaining three quartiles are proportionately more heavily populated by women than men. The inference drawn when considering the quartile data alongside the mean gender pay gap is that although there are more women in most of these quartile divisions, and almost a parity at the highest quartile, on average within the quartiles men hold very slightly better-paid jobs than women.

 

The organisation considers itself to be caring and recognises the complex needs of its employees through the practical application of supportive working practices.  Practical measures to support such statements include the adoption of flexible working arrangements implemented through its employment policies.  Other policies have also been introduced to support women in the workplace such as the “Menopause in the Workplace Policy” and the Equality Policy (Employment) has also been reviewed in early 2021.

 

Although the organisation does not yet have a neutral mean gender pay gap, the gap continues to remain low relative to many other businesses. This positive position reflects the organisation that we aspire to be; a fair place to work and one in which supportive employment policies go hand-in-hand with an established and transparent job evaluation scheme. A risk to the ability to further improve the mean gender pay gap is that the organisation is relatively small and the change in occupation of a few of the Council’s most senior posts could have a material effect on the outturn. A watching brief will be maintained each year and should the outturn worsen to a point of concern then an appropriate action plan will be identified.